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December 14, 2005

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amanda

check out the epicurious site - courtesy of Hannukah they even have photographs of how to roll up rugelach.
FYI in Israel (where I live) rugelach are made from croissant dough rolled really thin and filled with cocoa/margarine(butter if you go to a really fancy shop)/sugar mix. No cream cheese anywhere in the dough or filling. Go figure.
PS I check out your site daily and really enjoy your outlook and recipes, thanks

lindy

Amanda-Thanks.
I am having some trouble finding the epicurious feature on the site- any hints?
I have made sweet rugelach (cream cheese variety) without a rolling problem, but this filling (which I like) seems particularly ornery.
I am surprised that the Israeli rugelach is so different.So interesting. I always thought the cream cheese version had been around forever. It is great how traditional foods morph to adapt to different times and places.

anapestic

I think the site amanda was referring to is

http://www.epicurious.com/cooking/holiday/hanukkah/rugelach

Perhaps if the filling were at room temperature, it would be easier to spread? I'm not sure exactly where you're having the difficulty, but then those rugelach look great to me.

lindy

Thanks, found it.
Actually, the problem seemed to be more in the excessive mooshiness and resultant glop all over the dough-plus unsightly bulges. You have given me an idea though. Next time I will chill the filling, to help it stay put during rolling.

amanda

Glad you found the site, the chill trick is definitely an idea, the other one is make rounds of the filling on parchment paper, freeze it for about half an hour and then turn it upside down on the rolled out dough and unpeel. The other thing is that the Israeli version seems to have about six turns before you get to the pointy end, so the filling is spread really thinly but you end up with alot of it, just layered.
Good luck!

mzn

Yes, there are two kinds of rugelach, some made with cream cheese and some made with shortening or something like it. I've even seen a recipe calling for schmaltz rendered with a vanilla bean to make it more suitable for baking with sweet ingredients. My opinion is that the cream cheese rugelach are much better but I'm just one guy.

We often have chocolate rugelach in the freezer and I am sometimes so impatient as to eat one ice-cold. It's better than you might think.

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