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December 15, 2006

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Tanna

Are the pastries the first picture? Those look beautiful.
So instead of stuffing the body cavity, the stuffing goes under the skin. That sounds pretty interesting.
Your menue sounds wonderful, hope you can move soon after.

lindy

Ooops-No pastry pictures yet Tanna- those are the pletzlach. (Onions and poppyseeds on there! )Hopefully there will be enough pastries left for a photo when I get around to writing them up.
I'm moving, but slowly.

Trig

My dad is the son of a Polish refugee to the East End of London and although he is not observant and I am not Jewish as dad married out, I was brought up to appreciate Jewish food. I still remember the first time I ate latkes in "The Falafel House" in Haverstock Hill. Dad used to make them at home with Osem latke mix, which is no longer available in the shops, and I've been talking about making latkes from scratch for ages. Can you post me a recipe, please!!! (with photos so dad can see how to do it). Some recipes I've seen on blogs call themselves latke but look more like hash browns to me.

Happy Chanukah.

lindy

Hello Trig!
There are quite a few of us blended types around. Though I married Irish-American,myself, my son in law has the same melting pot mix as our daughter.
I'm afraid I'm not the person for your genuine latke recipe..the one I'm planning on posting is my own latke/kugel hybrid, born out of the problems involved in frying individual potato pancakes, while making other things for a dinner.(Too much last minute insanity and hot oil are a poor mix in a home kitchen)
The hybrid thing is essentially a thin crispy kugel, baked in the oven..kind of made like a southern style cornbread in a preheated pan with hot oil in it, so that it is crispy on the bottom.
Real latkes are best done as the main attraction..served with just some sour cream and/or applesauce. They are yummy, but I don't have them down well, myself.
I wonder if someone could offer Trig a link to a really good, authentic latke recipe? Give us a hand?

Trig

Thanks Lindy. I guess I'm more calm in the kitchen than you, but I bet my dad would give you a good competition for panic of the day in front of the stove.

Trig

Hey Lindy,

I've at long last found someone who seems to have a real latke recipe, complete with a video. "Serious Eats" has posted a long article on food for Hanukkah with this great footage of forming and frying the latkes...

http://www.seriouseats.com/2006/12/this_last_sunday_my_wife.html

Raspberry Sour

Hi Lindy, I was eyeing the NYTimes Hungarian Hannukah as well, but was a little worried about trying them out on unsuspecting guests. I'm glad to hear everything worked out so well- no more excuses for me now! The turkey looks great too- chicken is usually the more common poultry, unless it's Thanksgiving/X-mas; I like the variation,

Trig, I'm not sure there is any single authentic latke recipe- everyone's bubbe has her own version, and everyone has their own preference (as I'm sure you can tell from the comments on Serious Eats). I have to say, their version seems a little too complicated and fussy to me- latkes, born out of Eastern European poverty, are a fairly simple, basic dish. Another way to do them is to simply grind the potatoes to a pulp in the food processor, wisk in flour, eggs, and salt, then fry (I've always been advised to go with sunflower or canola oil in the same strict manner as Serious Eats is about peanut oil, so again, pick your preference, and go with it) for a slightly more pancake-y than fritter-y latke.

Whatever your preference, make sure you prepare and eat them quickly- latkes (and raw potato) don't take well to sitting around.

Enjoy! And Lindy, Happy Hannukah!

Baking Soda

I was on the look-out for Christmas recipes (I know, I am one of those people to whom Christmas comes as a surprise: Oh only a week to go? really?). And just yesterday I post-it a recipe from Maggie Glezers A blessing of bread called Flam Pletzel onion rounds for brunch, but now I am leaning towards your Pletzlach..
I always stuff my turkey under the skin, the meat won't dry out and the flavours really melt in. I will try your paprika infused oil! Sounds great.

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